Friday, March 12, 2010

Bowling Alley Mural Reviews: Triangulation

An overt response to the mid-20th century quadrilateral movement in kegel art, the bowling alley mural Triangulation by Anonymous brings a sarcastic approach to the geometric earth tone polygonal genre in masking units. Freed from the constraints of squares, rectangles, trapezoids, and parallelograms, Anonymous is irreverent in her demonstration that despite the four-sided shackles imposed by lane end geometry, no self-respecting muralist must be confined to angular sums of 360 degrees. Thus, the artist makes the centerpiece of her work an inverted pink triangle overlying fields of beige to brown. Oblique and horizontal black bars bring depth to what would be otherwise a rendition of fragmented construction paper overlapping on a featureless plane. One must not search deeply for meaning in this sure to be classic of bowling art. Regrettably, I feel compelled to borrow a quotation from the renowned bowling art critic, Pierre Bordeaux who wrote of Triangulation (roughly translated from the original Basque), "The meaning could not be more clear. From time immemorial, the inverted triangle has symbolized the female organ, in all of its vulvacious glory, and what better a medium for expressing it than a target at which we propel our balls." What more remains to be said? Nothing.

8 comments:

  1. I would like to get that quote tattooed right smack dab in the center of my bowling ability. (Did you translate it from the original Basque?) (If you did, I'd be impressed, since there are Basques who can't speak Basque.) Seriously, though-- it IS a good quote!

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  2. Oh yeah, I am fluent in more I am fluent in over six million forms of communication.

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  3. It's little wonder that your wife loves you...

    And Star Fleet needs you, by the way.

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  4. Actually, I heard somewhere once that Basque is the only living dead language on Earth today...

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  5. It is a wonder that she does. I have a hard time hiding my true nature.

    What does the expression "living dead" mean (other than in the context "night of the ...")? I would think that there are hundreds of aboriginal languages of Australia, North America, and South America that are on the way out but still spoken. Is that the same thing?

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  6. I think it means a written (key word, I think) language that was spoken in northern Iberia when Latin was spoken all over the Roman empire... Most Basques now speak Spanish or French. By all rights, it should have died out long ago. I'm no expert, though. Just passing along a little conjecture (based loosely on the facts).

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  7. Well, the only tidbit I can add to this is that the Indo-European language family in Europe is widely believed to have derived from the migration of middle eastern farmers into the continent ca. 7,000-5,000 years ago. As Basque is unrelated to modern European languages, some people feel that it is likely a remnant of the language spoken by the hunter-gatherer populations who lived there prior.

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  8. Well, then, it's one REALLY dead live language, I reckon... :)

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